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18 — Table Of Contents 



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dedication 






In January, 1983, Jim Woodruff joined the Southwestern staff. He has served as directors of 
publications, annual giving and development. Jim's responsibilities have been numerous — 
ranging from alumni relations to the annual Brown Challenge. 

Jim raises millions of dollars annual from alumni, businesses and charitable foundations. The 
nature of his work allows little time for contact with students; however, those who have 
dealt with him through the Phonathon or other means have grown to admire him greatly. 
His quick wit and outgoing personality makes every situation better. 

It gives me great pleasure to dedicate this 1986 edition of the Sou'Wester to James W. 
Woodruff. This is just to let you know we care, big guy. 



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Robert Lee Galloway 
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25 Freshmen arrive on campus. A new year begins! 

25 Samantha Smith, a Maine school-girl who toured the Soviet Union in 1983, is killed in tragic plane 
crash. 

28 Students grab their book and go back to class. 

30 Buses leave for Freshmen retreat - an famous SU tradition. 



22 — Calendar 



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Freshmen Retreat 1985: An Endless Cycle 
by Kenny Simon (The Megaphone) 

The opening scene was the same. The bus- 
es rolled in, received their cargo, and set 
off for the Greene Family Camp; the Jewis 
"Camp Hiawath" north of Temple. Yet 
another class of incoming freshmen have 
made it through that final barrier — the 
Freshmen Retreat, and are now ready to 
begin their respective college careers. Al- 
though not quite as exciting as last year's 
outing, this year did have its high points. 



to describe the sentiment of the weekend. 
The competition between teams was 
fierce. It lacked an element of friendliness 
that came through in the Olympics and 
especially in the final skits. Overall, people 
did enjoy themselves despite the tempera- 
tures of the day. 



As the buses were pulling out, one of the 
retreat's leaders, Don Heins, had serious 
doubts in his own mind as to the final 
outcome. Comments such as, "There may 
be a shortage of beds," and "There's been 
a run of the grunge ..." showed us exact- 
ly where his position lay. But from the 
optimists' camp, Yellow team leader, Rob 
Smith, felt that his team was "gonna win". 
Whether this prediction was a serious re- 
flection or due to a loss of mental faculty 
stemming from his happy state is hard to 
say. 

Smith's statement, however, is a good way 



As far as the day went, it was so hot (tem- 
perature was upwards of 104 degrees Far- 
enheit) that spirit died quickly. One excit- 
ing match of sit-down volleyball between 
Tan and Blue teams made one regain 
hope. The teams were tied nine all and 
trading serves for the final point to win the 
game. Finally, after a quick volley, Tan 
came out of the back to score for the win. 
It was a magnificent sight! Almost worth 
the heat. 

People did get a chance to cool off, pool- 
side. It was perhaps proportionately as 
crowded as Miami Beach. After the tube 
competition, everyone took a break and 
played. The diving boards quickly became 
the center of attraction, with the likes of 



Ed Galloway with his almost ballet-like 
moves. The hero of the day, however, be- 
come one individual affectionately nick- 
named, "Rambo," due to his attire. To the 
cries of Rambo! Rambo! Rambo! he would 
run from the board .... and hold his nose. 
He was fantastic! 

The retreat ended soon after dinner. 
Vague attempts at humor were made by 
all, especially during skits, which were 
tastelessly tacky. Ben Sherman finalized 
by giving a slide show and a good-bye ad- 
dress just short of being a tearjerker. Ac- 
knowledging the increase in growth of the 
freshmen class Sherman said, "We may be 
growing out of this place." 

Whatever the case may be Southwestern's 
Freshmen Retreat does play an important 
part in the indoctrination of students to 
this campus. It is a time for good clean 
fun. The cycle has begun again. 



23 



Septemb 




D 




10 Student Elections offer a chance for leadership. 

11 Pete Rose breaks Ty Cobbs record for most hits - 4192. 
17 Sororities give out open bids. 

19-20 Devastating earthquakes rock Mexico - killing more than 7000. 

22 Farm Aid, Willie Nelson's attempt to help the nation's farmers, takes place in Champaign, 111. 

22 International Students raise their flags in the Commons. 

22 Fraternities hold Upperclass Rush. 

26 Secretary of State, Myra McDaniel addresses students and others as a part of the Jessie Daniel Ames 
lecture series. 



24 




•* '•"f-e'A- 




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Flag Ceremony Honors International Students 

by Kris McGowen (The Megaphone) 



They come from far away — over oceans, 
mountains, equators, rivers, and borders. They 
come from ancient countries and new. Most 
have grown up speaking a foreign tongue in a 
culture quite different from that of America. 
Their names may be as difficult to spell as 
Ewout Barendregt or as simple as Bernard 
Brown, but they all share one thing in common: 
they are foreign students who have chosen to 
study at SU. 

On Sunday, September 22, Friends of the In- 
ternational House sponsored the second annual 
International Flag Ceremony. 

In this ceremony the students representing 
their various native countries describe what 
their flags mean and carry them through the 
commons to be mounted on the wall. 

The flags are arranged in alphabetical order 
beginning with Brazil just to the left of the 
American flag. Bernard Brown and David 
Walter are Brazil's contribution to SU. The 
Canadian flag is just to the left of Brazil's. It is 
placed there in honor of student Mike Hazell. 



Francoise Mouroux is the French representa- 
tive, and Prabha Ganapathy and Ashok Mittal 
are here from India. Kianoush Kian is the resi- 
dent Iranian and Amos Sendolo comes from 
Liberia. 

The Malaysian flag is next, representing sopho- 
mores Azizah Aziz, Noradila Ismail, Rosmala 
Hussien, and Nor Haliza Rahman. 

Abraham Alvarez and Idalia Pinon are from 
Mexico. The Netherlands contributed Ewout 
Barendregt, Rutger Helbing, and Jurrien Pen- 
tinga, Maria Siu is from Panama, Fiorella Cer- 
uti is from Peru, Lena Hoegfeldt is from Swe- 
den, and from Zimbabwe is Ruth Gwindi. 

The evening was highlighted by several inter- 
esting events. The Dutch students, Jurrien 
Evout, and Rutger all broke into their national 
anthem as their flag was mounted. All three 
gave a moving acappella rendition of what 
sounded suspiciously like a Dutch drinking 
song. In fact, Ewout Barendregt spent most of 
the reception afterwards trying to convince 
amused guests that it was indeed the national 



anthem of the Netherlands. 

Maria Siu from Panama gave a thought-pro- 
voking description of what she interpreted her 
national flag to mean. The Panamanian flag is 
divided into quarters, with one red square, a 
white square with a blue star, a blue square, 
and a white square with a red star. She said 
that in her opinion the red square symbolized 
North America, the blue square represented 
South America, and the stars were the world 
and universe. In the very center, where all 
squares come together, is Panama, which is the 
bridge of the world and universe. 

The most touching part of the ceremony was 
the opening address by President Roy B. Shil- 
ling. He said that the presence of the students 
from overseas benefits both the faculty and 
students of Southwestern, and "helps us recog- 
nize and remember our world citizenship." He 
expressed hope that every student here at 
Southwestern studies at least one semester 
abroad and that more foreign students will en- 
roll here. 



Calendar — 25 



d 



Octolo 



er 





2 Actor Rock Huson dies of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). 

3-5 Stephanie Smith, Candy Oertling, and cast give fantastic performances in Mask and Wig's "crimes of 
the Heart." 

11-13 SU welcomes alumni home! 

1 1 Pikes win University Sing with "Pikes of Penzance" Alpha Delta Pi is second, and Delta Zeta finishes 
third. 

12 Alumni Association present awards. 

14-18 Reality sets in - Mid-semester week haunts students. 

24-27 SU gets a break - Fall break 

27 The Kansas City Royals take the World Series in 7 games. 



26 — Calendar 



««S3 




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Alumni Association Awards 

by Buffie Evans and Beth Yandell (The Megaphone) 



The Alumni Association Board of Direc- 
tors has proudly selected Dr. Robert L. 
Soulen and Charles Saterfield, Jr. as the 
1985 recipients of the Mr. Homecoming 
Award and the Pearl A. Neas Service 
Award, respectively. These annual awards 
represent two of the highest honors given 
by the Alumni Association. 

Mr. Homecoming is an honor conferred 
by the Alumni Association on a member 
of the faculty as a token of affection and 
respect to one who has played an impor- 
tant part in the college days of grateful 
students. Sometimes the awards is Mrs. or 
Miss Homecoming, but it always carries 
with it a special meaning to the recipient; 
it means that graduates recall with appre- 
ciation what the recipient contributed to 
the education and general maturity of stu- 
dents during important formative years. 

One of the faculty members most exempli- 
fying these required qualities is Dr. Robert 
Soulen. Originally from Chicago, Illinois, 



Dr. Soulen received his B.A. in Chemistry 
and Physics from Baker University in 
1954. In 1955, he entered the Army Signal 
Corps and received a diploma in micro- 
wave radio repair. After serving in the 
army, he continued his education at Kan- 
sas State University, where in 1960 he re- 
ceived a Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry. Dr. 
Soulen then joined the Jefferson Chemical 
Company of Austin where he worked as a 
Senior Research Chemist. Motivated by a 
desire to work with people, he left his ex- 
ploratory research to join the faculty of 
Southwestern in 1964 as the first Brown 
Chairholder. Dr. Soulen finds his field 
"fascinating and easy to teach" because he 
enjoys the subject matter so much. This 
job also enables him to study and research 
on his own. 

The Pearl A. Neas Service Award was 
established for the purpose of recognizing 
long and faithful service to the University. 
The Award is named for the late Miss 
Pearl A. Neas who served Southwestern 



for 49 years, 38 of them as registrar. The 
recipient of the 1985 award is Charles Sa- 
terfield. Mr. Saterfield is a cook for the 
University Commons. He has been em- 
ployed by Southwestern since 1959. He is 
married and has four children, two of 
which are S.U. graduates. 

He is also active in church and civic af- 
fairs. Mr. Saterfield was Financial Secre- 
tary for his church from 1975 to 1984 and 
was Trustee in 1 984. He also served on the 
Urban Renewal Board and on the Bicen- 
tennial Committee. In 1983, he was 
awarded the Citizen of the Year Award by 
the Citizen Memorial Association. 

Dr. Soulen and Mr. Saterfield are to be 
commended for their tremendous contri- 
butions to the University, both awards are 
distinctive and meaningful, and the recipi- 
ents are chosen with care. Congratulations 
to these men! 



27 




B 



5 Elections. Kathy Whitmire wins in Houston mayors race. Jim Colbert wins in Georgetown's Mayors race. 

7 Women's volleyball team eliminated from contention by St. Edwards. 

7 Students hold Abortion debate in the Cullen Auditorium. 

9 British royalty, Prince Charles and Princess Diana visit the US for the first time together. 

14-17 Mask and Wig Player's present "Romeo and Juliet" 

19-20 President Ronald Reagan and USSR General Secretary Gorbachev hold a summit meeting in Geneva. 

21 Mark Hsaio gobbles up competition in Intermural Turkey Trot. 

24 Southwestern Symphony gives a concert in the Fine Arts Building. 

27-30 Thanksgiving Break!!!!!!! (Rest up for finals) 



28 — Calendar 




B 



Phonathon Raises Money And A Horse For Southwestern 

by Kris McGowen (The Megaphone) 



Ten years ago, when Southwestern was in fi- 
nancial trouble, the Brown Foundation of 
Houston set up the Brown Challenge, which 
matches gifts from alumni and friends at least 
$1:$1. If an alumni increases his contribution 
over last year's, the Foundation will double or 
triple it depending on the amount. To raise 
money for this challenge, S.U. set up the Phon- 
athon, an annual solicitation of the alumni to 
contribute as much as is possible. 

This year's Phonathon began on October 20 
and is scheduled to continue through Novem- 
ber 7. After the October 29th session, the 
Phonathon had raised $48,782 and one regis- 
tered Arabian foal. The goal is to beat last 
year's record of $73,000 during the next six 
sessions. 

The Brown Challenge annually meets about 20 
percent of Southwestern's instructional budget. 
The Challenge affects things like scholarships 
and financial aid, the size and quality of the 
faculty and staff, various educational re- 
sources, etc. 

"One way to look at it is this: your tuition pays 



less than half of the actual cost of your educa- 
tion. A big part of the difference comes from 
alumni support every year. So it's crucial that 
we encourage alumni to support the Universi- 
ty," said Jim Woodruff, Associate Director of 
Development. 

More important than raising money, though, is 
that through proven alumni support philan- 
thropists and foundations are more likely to 
agree to support the University through very 
large gifts. In other words, if the people who 
know Southwestern best, its former students, 
support the university, then other groups and 
individuals are more likely to do the same. 

The remaining sessions of the Phonathon are 
tonight (Thursday) from 6:30 to 9, Saturday 
morning, 9 until 1 p.m., Sunday and Monday 
nights, 6:30 to 9, and Wednesday and Thursday 
nights, 6:30 to 9. The program may be ex- 
tended a few more nights if people are interest- 
ed in helping. The Phonathon is being held in 
the Mood-Bridwell Atrium. 

The main work behind the program is provided 
by students willing to donate their time to help- 



ing the university. This year Bob Boger, Kate 
Butler, John Hill, Gaylon Morris, Whitney An- 
derson, Jan Perkins, Daniel Zorn, Lara Degen- 
hart, Richard Light, Amy Smith, Julie Reeves, 
Jana Jordan, Irene Patterson, Steve Rucinski 
and others have been very effective in helping 
the university. 

"We need better participation, and people can 
drop by anytime even for 20 or 30 minutes. 
People are having a good time calling up these 
alumni, and it's just an interesting, productive 
event," said Woodruff. "We're hoping in the 
next six calling sessions we an get even more 
people to come by." 

The top four callers and one wild card will win 
a ski trip this year at Spring Break. The compe- 
tition is based on the three best nights, so atten- 
dance every night is not absolutely necessary to 
compete. 

"Plus, there are door prizes and a general air of 
wild excitement, particularly when Mary Akin 
is racing around," Woodruff said. 



29 



JMP# 



decernber 





2 Phillipine General, Fabian Ver is acquitted for murder of Benigno S. Aquino, Jr. 

5 Annual Candlelight Service is held in Chapel. 

6 Georgetown holds annual Christmas Stroll. 

6 "Georgetown's Yesteryears, The People Remember" is presented by Dr. Martha Allen at Citizen's State 
Bank. The book was compiled by Allen and her students. 

8 OPEC abandons fixed price of oil. 

10 Georgetown greeted by a tornado. 

13-19 FINALS!!!!!!!! 

15 December graduates say goodbye to SU. 

25 Merry Christmas. 



30 — Calendar 




! 




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Tornado Waltzes Through Georgetown 

(The Megaphone) 



SU — December 10, about 5 p.m., the 
weather scene in Georgetown reached its 
apex for the year as a tornado blew in 
South from Round Rock. The tornado 
lasted about ten minutes, but not without 
leaving behind a small impression on those 
who witnessed its brief stay. 

It came along the eastern edge of town 
through Rabbit Hill; the Quail Valley sub- 
division, Hutto Rd., and the tip of South- 
western before heading out of town. It 
managed to get the attention of SU Presi- 



dent, Roy B. Shilling, Jr. as it went in 
between the old International House and 
the Shilling's backyard. The tornado up- 
rooted part of the fencework and small 
trees as well as taking with it parts of older 
trees on the edge of the golf course. SU 
groundscrew spent the cold Wednesday 
morning removing the debris. 

The city of Georgetown had its own crew 
busy cleaning debris from the tornado's 
wake, mostly along Hutto Rd. and sur- 
rounding area, Tuesday evening and early 



Wednesday morning. Five men were busy 
last night fighting time to cover houses 
before dark with plastics to the one or two 
that felt the brunt of the tornado's destruc- 
tive force. 

Georgetownites stood on their cars to 
watch the tornado pass through the area. 
A spokesman for city cleaning crew said 
that the damage incurred was entirely 
structural and no one was hurt or killed. 



31 




m 



1 Entertainer Ricky Nelson and his band die in plane crash near DeKalb. 

8 Ronald Reagan cuts all trade with Lybia. 

8 Back to School. 

10-12 Freshmen have a Greek experience - Formal Rush. 

26 Chicago Bears "shuffle" off with a 46-10 victory over the New England Patriots in the Super Bowl. 

27 SU retires two old friends - Ruth Thomas and Sally Teinert. 

28 Space Shuttle Challenger explodes - killing seven passengers, leaving NASA and entire nation in a state 
of shock. 



32 




01 



SU Retires Two Old Friends 

(The Megaphone) 



Two retiring employees of Southwestern University 
were honored at a reception Monday, Jan. 27. on the 
campus. 

Sally Teinert, switchboard supervisor, and Ruth 
Thomas, executive secretary to the vice president for 
fiscal affairs, were the honorees at an informal party 
that included words of appreciation from SU Presi- 
dent Roy B. Shilling, Jr. 

Teinert began working at SU in 1 966 as a housekeep- 
er in Laura Kuykendall Residence Hall, where she 
says the resident freshmen women called her their 
"mom away from home." 

Teinert has vivid memories of those years. She says 
she can't forget the $1 an hour wage or the starched 
white dress that was her uniform. 

After several years as housekeeper in the LK resi- 
dence hall, Teinert switched to working in the Cullen 
building and Herman Brown/ Moody-Shearn resi- 
dence halls. 

In 1981 she became a switchboard operator, working 
the 3-11 pm shift, and in 1984 she took on a new 
challenge as switchboard supervisor. 

An enjoyable part of her job, she says, has been 



getting to know the students. In fact, some of SU's 
female alumni still recognize her voice on the phone. 

"I sure am going to miss this place," Teinert said. "I 
hate to retire, but my husband wants me to enjoy life 
with him." 

Teinert, who moved to Georgetown from Giddings in 
1 950, and her husband, Ernest, also retired, have four 
children, six grandchildren and one greatgrandchild. 

Teinert said her leisure time will be spent cleaning 
house, gardening, sewing, crocheting and fishing with 
her husband. 

Thomas, who began her work at SU in 1962 as a 
part-time employee in the business office, will com- 
plete 24 years of service this month. 

She became chief accountant in 1963 when there 
were three employees in her area who shared one 
typewriter and one calculator. 

One piece of equipment Thomas has never missed 
but will always remember is a temperamental and old 
check-posting machine, she says. 

Thomas says she was one person who was glad to see 
the university add more desks and typewriters, and 



automate business office systems. 

In 1970, Thomas became executive secretary to the 
SU vice president for fiscal affairs. 

She has always worked in the Cullen Building except 
for the time the business office moved during Cul- 
len's remodeling. 

Thomas said she has enjoyed her job "because no two 
days are alike." 

A native of Gonzales County, Thomas has been in 
Georgetown since 1944. She and her husband, J.D. 
Thomas, Jr., a native of Georgetown, have four chil- 
dren and five grandchildren. 

Thomas plans to enjoy her retirement. "People tell 
me I'll miss working, but I'll be busy at home, visiting 
with the kids and grandkids, sewing, gardening and 
working on the farm. I don't think I'll miss getting up 
every morning and coming to work," she said. 




D 



7 5 man junta replaces Jean-Claude Duvalier as leader of Haiti. 

8 Alpha Delta Pi wins Derby Day. 

13-16 Mask and Wig present Cole Porter's "Anything Goes" 

14-16 Students welcome their parents to SU for the weekend. 

19-22 Scholars travel to Georgetown for this year's Brown Symposium "Womanhood, Manhood and Public 
Life: Visions and Revisions of Gender in America." 

24-28 Mid-Semester Week again. 

25 Ferdinand Marcos flees the Phillipines; Corazon Aquino takes over as President. 



34 — Calendar 




D 



SU Lacrosse Club Tastes Sweet Victory 

by Beverly Couzens (The Megaphone) 



Anyone who ever doubted hard work, 
dedication and perserverance pay off was 
proven wrong on Sunday, February 9 
when the Southwestern Lacrosse Club 
won their first game with a 9 to 5 victory 
over Rice University. 

Cold temperatures, light misting rain, and 
mud helped the game get off to a slow 
start. Rice scored the first two goals, but 
the Bucs battled back to tie the game 3-3 
by the end of the half. Freshmen Jerry 
Young and Don Earls kept S.U. in the 
game with seven goals between them. 

Coach Curtis was obviously pleased with 



his win against the Owls and is anxiously 
looking forward to the two games sched- 
uled for Parent's Weekend. "I'm extreme- 
ly proud of the team," said Curtis. "With 
continued progress I feel we can be com- 
petitive with anyone in the league. I think 
this weekend will let us know how far the 
team has actually come." 

The Southwestern Lacrosse Club was 
started three years ago by former Univer- 
sity of Texas player Bill Norris. For two 
years the team was plagued by inexperi- 
ence and small numbers. This year the 
team said goodbye to Coach Norris due to 
a change in job locations. Former players 



Monty Curtis and Robert Young stepped 
in to fill the void. For the first time in the 
team's history the Bucs have more than 
enough players to field a team with a re- 
cord number of 32 players. 

One thing the team has had a good supply 
of over the past three years is support from 
the fans. Coach Young has been very 
pleased with the turnout of fans at pre- 
vious games. "I'm overwhelmed by the 
number and their support," said Young. "I 
hope to see the number continue to grow 
this weekend when we play Texas A&M 
on Saturday and Sam Houston State on 
Sunday." 



m 



iMaroK 





1 Swedish Prime minister Palme assassinated in Stockholm. 

2 Texas is 150, and SU holds a Texas-sized celebration for the occasion. 
7-16 Students flock to the beaches, slopes for Spring Break. 

10 Texas teachers take TECAT (competency tests) for the first time in history. 

18-21 Willson lecture series on campus. 

24 US planes knock out Lybian missle base in retaliation for Lybian attacks. 

27-31 Another holiday, this time it's Easter. 

30 Film legend, James Cagney dies at 86. 



36 — Calendar 




H 



Georgetown Prepares For Sesquicentennial Festival 

(The Megaphone) 



The Georgetown High School Band, the Sweet Ade- 
lines and local Scout troops are just some of the area 
groups taking part in Southwestern University's ses- 
quicentennial festival Sunday, March 2. 

The Georgetown community is invited to the campus 
that day for lots of barbeque, music ranging from 
fiddling to barbershop harmony, some horseshoe 

I tossing and lots of visiting, in honor of Texas lnde- 

i pendence Day. 

, The haute cuisine of Texas — barbecue brisket, 
I chicken, pinto beans, potato salad, cornbread, cook- 
'< ies and brownies — will be servied buffet style from 
1 1 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the grounds between the Lois 
I Perkins Chapel and the Bishops Memorial Union. 

1 Seating will be available in the Union and on the 
: grounds, but, to get the feel of a real Texas barbecue, 
bring blankets. 

Tickets may be purchased "at the door" or through 
the University Events office, 863-1483. Prices will be 
announced later. 

Attire is whatever you want to wear, said University 
Events Director Sharon Turman. 



"We've had 1 50 years of history. Anything's appro- 
priate — pioneer costumes, church clothes, jeans, 
boots ... ," she said. 

As the school's contribution to the statewide ringing 
of the Bells of Independence, a historic bell from 
SU's original building site will be moved from the 
Mood Heritage Museum outside, and rung at exactly 
noon. If you want to tell your grandchildren you 
played a role in the historical ringing, feel free to 
bring your own bell, Turman said. 

For the more musically minded, the award-winning 
Georgetown High School Band takes the stage at the 
Alma Thomas Theater at 2 p.m. 

Barbershop harmony by the Sweet Adelines, fiddling 
and banjo-playing by SU music professor Dr. Anth- 
ony Adessa and his wife Laurie Adessa, and a Texas 
medley of song and dance by the SU Delta Zeta 
sorority at 4 p.m. tops the theater entertainment. 

In between the musical tributes will be five to eight- 
minute orations by the three finalists in SU's annual 
speech contest. The topic? "The Significance of the 
Texas Sesquicentennial." 

Throughout the day, games and contests, ranging 



from the action-packed three-legged races to check- 
ers and dominoes, will be offered. 

Local Scout troops will provide games for the youn- 
ger Texans. Most outdoor activities will take place 
between the theater and the Union. 

The Georgetown Heritage Society's exhibit, Evolu- 
tion of Family Life in Georgetown, will open the day 
of the festival at the museum, and will be on display 
for the public. 

In the event of inclement weather . . . well, that's yet 
to be decided but Turman guarantees no rain . . . 
probably. 

In checking with data from the National Weather 
Service, she found that for the last three years, the 
day of March 2 was cloudy with lows in the upper 50s 
and highs in the upper 70s. The wind blew a whop- 
ping 10 to 12 miles an hour from the south. 

"Whatever the weather, we promise a fun-filled festi- 
val for Texans of all ages," she said. 




d 



1 Mexicana Airlines flight #727 crashes, killing 166. 

3-7 SU Chorale goes on tour. 

16-19 Mask and Wig present "Experiments in Theatre." 

29 Major nuclear accident occurs at Chernobyl. Soviets discount tragedy. 

30 Last day of classes. 



38 — Calendar 




D 



Late Night With Doug 

by Kenny Simon (The Megaphone) 

What do students do when they get the 
late night hungries when studying? Well, 
they used to go to 7-Eleven, but not since 
the advent of Chez Doug here on campus. 
The man's name is Doug Frobese and he is 
the one-man operation that SAGA has set 
up every Monday through Thursday, from 
9-12 midnight in the Union Snack Bar. 
Since its opening Doug has been busy 
cooking, serving, and consequently mak- 
ing a name for himself. 

Frobese is a Junior transfer student from 
Arkansas College. He is an English Major 
here at Southwestern and hails from the 
Houston/Pereland area of the state. 

Doug got started because like most other 
college students he needed a job. Having 
amassed some experience in the snack bar 
Field in Arkansas, he found himself talking 
to Bob Stage. Stage had plans for a late 
night snack bar operation to give students 



an alternative late night food stop. With 
his experience, Frobese was the perfect 
man for the job and having arrived at a 
fortuitous moment, he began immediately. 

Although the facilities were much smaller 
in Arkansas, Doug had never experienced 
the one-man operation before, especially 
in a casual late-night setting. He has 
quickly asserted his prowess and skill in 
the minds of his customers, as students, 
many of them regulars, come every night 
to chat with Doug and take part in some of 
his backwoods cuisine. 

Doug Frobese is apparently very popular 
with his customers, who come to him with 
smiles on their faces and a friendly word 
for the man with the spatula. Rutger Helb- 
ing, a frequenter of Chez Doug says that 
Frobese really knows his customers and 
that he (Helping) "doesn't even have to 
ask for (his) coffee anymore." 



Other names that people use to refer to the 
Snack Bar, are Doug's Place and Doug's 
Food Palace. 

Doug says that it is just a job and that it 
"beats washing dishes. "Doug also com- 
mented that as a transfer, it has given him 
a chance to meet a lot of people and make 
some friends along the way. Between his 
studying and his bagpipes and guitar, 
Doug does not have much time for any- 
thing else. When asked about his growing 
popularity with the student populace, 
Doug said "sure they like me, they don't 
want to offend the Chef ... I just cook the 
food and take the money." For a late night 
break, a little bite to eat, and some fast 
and furious service try Late Night with 
Doug Frobese, serving until midnight. 




iii afc^M fc ^_*!^ 






11CMJ 





B 



3-9 FINALS! 

3 Mark White and Bill Clements battle it out once again for Governor. White wins democratic nomination, 
while Clements takes the Republican nod. 

10 Seniors say farewell to Southwestern — Commencement Convocation is held in Theatre. 

10 Dr. Leonard Giesecke is awarded the William Carrington Finch Award. 



40 




B 



Pirates Season 'Disappointing' 

by Ed Combs (Georgetown Weekly) 



Most baseball coaches would be satisfied 
with a 46-30 record and a trip to the play- 
offs. Not Southwestern's Jim Mallon. 

"I'm kind of disappointed," Mallon said. 
"I don't think we reached the goals we 
started out with this year. We wanted to go 
to the NAIA World Series and we wanted 
to play the best baseball we were capable 
of. I don't feel we did that. We were just 
inconsistent all year." 

Mallon is used to more. While the Pirates 



.605 winning percentage is respectable in a 
lot of books, SU's coach came in to the 
season with a lifetime winning percentage 
of .666. 

"We had a lot of injuries, but I'm not using 
that as an excuse," Mallon said. "We just 
didn't play very well." 

SU's inconsistency especially glaring in 
the District IV playoffs in San Antonio 
earlier this month. The Pirates began the 
double-elimination tournament with im- 



pressive victories of 8-4 and 8-6. Then they 
turned around and lost their last two by 
scores of 7-6 and 12-3. 

But when the Pirates' season ended a little 
earlier than Mallon had hoped, he wasted 
little time in getting to work on next sea- 
son. 



Calendar — 41 



Right: Students outside of Mood 

Bridwell. Lower left: The campus 

fountain. Lower right: The Cullen 

Building. Opposite left: The Moody- 

Shearn patio. Opposite right: Students 

study in the librar\ . 






OLD TRADITIONS 



Southwestern 





■"■:■ ;■"■ '■■■-■■: 




•J. '< ',' i • 




1*%* 




Southwestern University's campus 

has been called one of Texas' 

most beautiful and best-planned 

college facilities. Located in a 

residential area on the eastern 

edge of the city, the 32 buildings 

situated on 500 acres supply an 

unusually fine environment for 

living and learning, (this page) 

Roy and Lillie Cullen Building. 

(opposite page, top) University 

Commons (bottom) Mood- 

Bridwell Hall. 




44 — Campus 





m 



Campus — 45 



(p. 46, top) Alma Thomas Fine Arts 

Center (lower left) The Field House, or 

Student Development Center (lower 

right) The Kyle E. White Religious 

Activities Center (opposite page, top) 

Lois Perkins Chapel (lower) The 

Fondren-Jones Science Hall 




46 — Ca 





D 



Campus — 47 



W^\ V 





(top) The Cody Memorial Library 
(lower left) Bishops' Memorial Union 
(lower right) The McCook - Crain 
Clinic, or University Relations office . ,, *-**»' 

(opposite top) The Jim West > > : 

Gymnasium (lower) The Sid Richardson - 

Physical Education Center , 






• --C»$*:3 ■*- f>S -s,~^i. V^lM* 



w. : ' 




48 — Campus 









Campus — 49 



(top) McCullough Hall (middle) Martin 

Ruter Hall (lower left) Kurth Hall 

(lower right) The President's Home 

(opposite, top) Brent Atrium (lower) 

The Master Plan 




50 — Campus 




31) ^3P ^ 




Campus — 51 




(top) Herman Brown Hall (middle) Moody-Shearn Hall 
(lower) Kappa Alpha House (opposite, top) Kappa Sigma 
House (middle) Phi Delta Theta House (lower) Pi Kappa 

Alpha House 






52 — Campus 




»i*s 



* f * f f F f f I I i i ] I I i i I f * ' * * * "■ i » i » » • ■ f * - - " - * - §~i iiin9t9' ! "'~~'"~"" , ~'~~''" * 




•. 




Campus — 53 




OLD TRADITIONS . . . fitW directions 



54 Honors 





Honors 55 



II « l 

H 

Hi J til. 





The William Carrington Finch Award 
Dr. Leonard Giesecke 




56 — Honors 



i n II 

Greek Awards 



S Kapp ^^^^^^^^ Lori 
Outstanding Greek Woman: Sara Rushing 



Honors — 57 




iiniiiii 1 



'// 



onor Societies: New Membei 



A^j?HHi 



Dcbra J. Carmack 
Jon C. Rice 

l^%%iTaylor 

juniors: 

Angela G. Bosvvcll 

..the red ge 
ouci : l.. Gipson 
Jennie K. Jones 

IPs" ey» ^oM SK 

Alicia L. LarijM£ 
Cynthia E. Merrill 
Ceborah K. Mittafick 
Elizabeth Rathburn 
■yPp A.* 
Elizabeth 
Sharn M. Shumway 
Holly E. Sylvester 
W. Mon 



Do 

Leslie C. Willian... 
Kristi L. Wright 
"-"- n .. Yamka 






Claudia A. Berlanga 



Marianina Fowler 
Maria I. Grillo 




K. JaCKSUII JUIICS 

Pamela G. Lester 
Epwiifcr L. Qr&tf 3 
Elizabeth 
Candacc Sout.. 



Psi Chi 



Michael C. Adams 
'een A. Brady 
L. Davenport 
jcmtv' A. Kee 
Patricia M. Kenyon 
!/ :ia M. Machecek 
E. Pa redes ,. . 
L. Sheppard 
Nancy J. Wiegand 
Nancy E. Wofford 



Thanh Thi Van 



Science Socie 

Brian E. Cressman 
Brad Jacobson 
o Jin kirn 

.'\Kin ivicuoweii 
1 ^&£M : - Minter 
Christine Moulds 
Kgj&oyce Obar^pP 
B. David Rovve 
David G. Walter 
Vivian L. Ward 
Tracev E. Weir 



ma Delta Pi 

< Kimbrough 
...an C. McKeever 
Sharon M. Shumway 




-iiology; 

James M. Harvey 
Je ffrey S. Wang 

Chemistry 
Mai * C Hsiao 

^'ta L. Brown 
Joanna L. SeJJers 



History; 
Ma ™ M. Her„a„de Z 

Physical Education- 
De bora S. Will iamson 

Psychology 
Laura L. Sprinkle 

Sociology; 

Tammy - K. Graham 
Music: 
Debra J- Carmack 

Theatre and Speech 

Communication- 
Candace B. Oertling 
Tr acy L.Mayer g 



departmental Award< 

Marth Joe N £*« 
Gerald.ne Wigg ins 

5pV CLUB 

Mc'-nda K. Baker 
Ho ly M . King 
Meh ^ K. Marcon, 

Laura M . Adam 
Kar en A. Monk 

A D K A DS °^RON 

Jw I Ca ™ ac k 
Na "cy L. Yerkes 





„•■•'>■' 



.v.- M . ^ /#, 






:-".#r '-.«■'■■ 






, V* s 







on A 
> Don Anderson 
*. Andersc 
'As' 



James R. Boger 



: Mr-, ,; 



Susan Mi 

Karen R. Dulaney 

Stacy L. ' 



? : *r'*"....*Mis. 



., . .. , ; ^ ^. ^ <v: _ .., .. >; .. ,., . . 



ine Bradley 
*n*A. Bradv 









lennelh M. Flint 
l " ' "e Flood 



J. Br in 






*?er Carlson 
Scott A. Carrell » 
O. Cau 




Tracy Lynn Harting 
ct&vjf l. Heath 

" I). Helmcamp 
nn Heningtofi 
y VI . II <k " 
„Jarie HoL_„^ 
Michael K. Holan 
Susan Lvnn Hook 






ph A. Iri2farry 
*Ji A. Jacob 

W. Janak . 



r \ »- 

■ " •* :<-' 



60 — Honors 



* * 



nction List 









; . 



Brian W. Kinkade 
Karen Lee Kuczag 

Jeffrey A. Lacy 
Alicia Leigh Laritz 
Pamela Gail Lester 
Jack Wayne Little 
Melissa Kay Marc. 
J. Alan McDowell 
Gerald W. McLe 
Archibald McN; 
Ernest Paul Mel 
Cynthia E. Merr 
Amy Elizabeth Miller 
Ann M. Minter 
Jessica H. Mitcham 
Ashok Mitlal 
Deborah K. Vlitta. 
David R. Monk 
Francoise Mouroux 
Dawn Jenkins Mundy 
Anne Ngo 

' L. Nix 
:e B. Oert 
Mary C. Olivarcs 
Jennifer Leah Peel 



Jan E. Perkins 
Kirsten Peterson 
Daniel J. Ramirez 






fatricia G; ...^ 
Caren Lyn Roper, 
idy Gavle Ross 









. 



ura L. 
Jtacey Shac„> 
Andy Lee Sheppard 
Sharon M, Shumway 
Jo Ann Sipt 

•rlenia 



•.- 



.aura Lee 
Deborah L. : 
James Andrew Stith 
r ^nnifcr Sto 1 - - 



, 



*;. ":» 



■ - , 




Jeffrey Alan Uphaus 
Thanh Thi Van 
David Vanderstrntrn 




? % *m»s 



^\'.:Mf'-Mr/^ A ;;^ 



Douglas Bret Wells 
Rimmon C. Whittaker 
Nan—- l «'■•—-» 




-J% 



Charles A. Wright 
JcfffyJ^Wright 

'ght 
\ an^gQ* 

/andell 
Shaista Yoosufani 
Kimberly Zgourides 
Debrn Joanne Carina^ 







.-Marshall- 

uise Yerkf 






ng 1986 Distinction List 



! aura Mae Adam 
.^Sfiihacl C. Adaim- „ 
Paul R. Albright. \* n ~ 
Anloin Don Anderson 
Kenneth R. AslaksQM^ 
Stephanie 1). Baker 
Robert M. Bednar 
Daniel S. Boobar 
l.ori Ann Boren 

L. Branstctte*^ 



kmkmaJJ.jL 
iregor\ Scott Brown 
Karen Su/anne Brown 
x\M Jane Buehanjjjra 
Andrea L. Burleson 
Donald \ . Campbe 
l.atislvTA.CtWtfp5< 
C+i rk tj>p k| ^Q irise 
Seolt A Carrell 
Beth L Chapoton 
Stacy Chiesa 
Deborah Dnsh Clausen 
I eigli Ann (lemons 
Keith MontgomeV v** 5 " 1 
'Kevin Martin Cole"^ « * 
Jiftt&Lwm Cook. * *»* 



Ruth A. Davis 
Theresa Elise Deal 
Lara A. Degenhart 
Melissa Dillingham 
Susan Melissa Dindot 
Karen R. Dulanev 
Stacy L. Dunavant 

^^erine A\*0J^ 
Susan Nelle Eastland 
Mare David Erck 
Teresa Ann Espinosa 
Wade B. Etheredge 
Trace Marie Etienne 
Kenri^fM. "Flint 
Lisa Yvonne toilette 
Stephanie D. Gar»i||£* 
Su/anne H. Goodley 
Holly Jean Graham 
Robert Wilborn Green 
Maria Isabel Grille 
Michael Sean Halden 
Steven D. HateS, 

rUr^Te an Hall * ! 

Susan Mrt&jiSF 
Kimberly Ann Haney 



Kristv Lynn Harrell 
Carol L. Heath 
||iijv»M. Henderson 
Kenneth W. Hern 
Gloria E. Hiebeler 
Sheila D. Hobratschk 
Joy Marie Holaday 

\. Holan 

-look 



.. Huang 
..i.^.w..,^ <». Hudson 
Pamela Gail Hurley 
Joseph A. Irizarry 
Brad Jacob.son 
John Joseph Jansscn 
Sandra D. Jefferson 
E?i£,?*£rtriur Jensen 
Jennie K. Jones 
Michael John Keahey 
Jeffery Alan Kee 
Kianoush Ktan 

Kelly R. Kimbrough 
Holly*Ma%" King 

• KM 1 \ 

re M. Landrv 



Spring 1986 Distinction List 








Alicia Leigh Laritz 
Stephen L. Lescher 
Pamela Gail Lester 
Claire B. Li-Pelaez 
Jack Wayne Little 
Valeric Anne Lovell 
Judith Ann Lukert 
Patricia A. Machacek 
Melissa Kay Marcom 
Garett E. Marshall 
Natalie A. Marshall 
Raummdo Martinez 
Glen I). McAvo) 
Duncan C. McKeever 
Amy L. McKnight 
Connie Jean McM 
Chris S. Medlenka 
Cynthia E. Merrill 
AJhok Mittal 
Deborah K. Mittanck 
Ginger L. Jones \1 
Michelle Moore 
Christine Moulds 
Francoise Mouroux 
Dawn Jenkins Mundy 
o 
'oe Nichol 



Mary C. Olivares 
Kathryn M. Parvin 
Kathleen E. Patrick 
Linda Jane Penniman 

Oh*. Jan E. Pejjjri 

BlC Kirsten Pe|e 

Daniel J. Ramirez 
Elizabeth Rathburn 
Jon E. Rice 
Patricia G. Rickey 

w/ Laura RigM " 
Kathryn "" 



Sylvia Sydow 
Ross Edmond Taylor 
Julia E. Tunnell 
James Edward Turner 
Jeffrey Alan Uphaus 
Thanh Thi Van 
Michelle D. Vanecek 
Amy L Vanwyngarderi 
Paul Damone VenabjV 
Laura Ann Walker 
Tracy R. Walker 



■.':':- . ■' . ■ .■ ": :: - 



Sheryl L. Nix 



Nicolette 



. B £ Ti 

>1 



Silke Anne L 
Nancy E. Schlatter 
Joanna Lynn Sellers 
Andy Lee Sheppard 
Sharon M. Shumwav 
Dena Li 
Stacey "... . 
Jo Ann Sip.._ 
Stephanie K. Smith 
Debra Richbufg Snow 
Deborah L. Stefek 
Susan Sh * r "' 






David A. ■__. 
Patti L. Summeral! 



ardashki 
Michael R. Weir Jr. 
Douglas Bret Wells 
Elizabeth A. Wheeler 

n; - " C. Whittak< 

ham: 
offorc 
'right 
Kristi L. Wright 
Kelley Renee Yamka 
Georgia B. Yandell 
Nancy Louisse Yerkes 
>u!ani 



our 
llackwoo 
Anita Lynn Brown 



























Honors 





Jpjl 




OLD TRADITIONS . Southwestern 



64 — Organizations 






UNIVERSITY 






°u/ s s£° 




ii* 



Organizations — 65 



m 




Students Studying Abroad 



Kimberly Allread, Donna Bishop, Shed Boren, Ted Bose, 
Heather Britt, Brooke Burris, Neal Burt, Greg Caudell, 
Theresa Deal, Lynn Douglass, Kathy Dunn, Rosalie Fedor, 
Daidella Floyd, Claire Foster, Marjorie Giesecke, Linda 
Grapski, Nikki Hottendorf, Rachel Jenkyn, Holly King, 



Elizabeth Lane, Elaine Marshall, Garett Marshall, Ray 
Martinez, Lori Mayfield, Scarlett Moss, Kristen Radford, 
Gayle Rigsby, Kathryn Rollins, Dawn Simmons, Jennifer Trost, 
Cliff Tuttle, Rimmon Whittaker. 



66 — Organizations 



Alpha Chi 



m 




Beth Yandell, Sylvia Sydow, Scott Carrell, Mark Hsaio, (second) Ellen Monk, Kern Monk, Laura Riggs, Ruth Davis, 
Kelly Henderson, (third) Selina Cortez, Kristi Wright, Laura Riggs, (fourth) Susan Hook, Brian Kincaid, Sarah Rushing, 
Michael Weir. 



Organizations — 67 



B 




Residence Life Staff 



68 — Organizations 



D 




Alpha Psi Omega 



(top) Darcy McFaddin, Candy Oertling (middle) Wendy Melton, Michelle Fincher, Stephanie 
Smith (bottom) Tracy Mayer, Marce Walsh. 



Organizations — 69 



D 




Cardinal Key 



(front) Jennifer Stokes, Ellen Monk, Ruth Davis, Caroline Jones, Jenni Jones, Susan Stevens, Lisa Brewer (back) Karen 
Monk, Kelly Henderson, Sarah Rushing, Michelle Fincher. 



70 — Organizations 



D 




Union Programming Council 



Joel Laurin, Theatre, Tim McGarrity, Films Radio and TV, Jessica Mitcham, Special Events, Kathy Weber, Cultural 
Events, Kristi Wright, Student Performances, Rob Corn, Technician, Jim Harvey, President. 



Organizations — 71 



a 




Symphonic Band 



(top) D'Wayne McFarland, Joel Laurin, Tim McGarrity, Tracy Mayer, John Weger (middle) Jeff Mallon, Angela Harris 
(bottom) Lyssa McDaniel, Wendy Melton, Amy Harris, Tracy Reese, Lara Degenhart, Leigh Ann Clemmons, Tom Stell, 
Marce Walsh. 



72 — Organizations 



30 






The Megaphone 



(top left) Kenny Simon - editor 
(right) Jay Huddleston - features 
(lower) Joey Gimenez - features 



Organizations — 73 



m 




Philosophy Club 

(front) John Jannsen, Sylvia Sydow (back) Mike Keller, Meg Field, Alan Kee, Steve Hales. 



74 — Organizations 



B 







FLUTES 

Stephanie Gartner, College Station 
Jennifer Gold, La Fayette, La. 
Deborah Mittanck, Bellville 
Mary Olivares, Corpus Christi 
Lisa Ravert, Dallas 

OBOE 

Lisa Head, Houston 
Melinda Murphy, Houston 

BASSOON 

Monique Brown, Georgetown 

CLARINET 

Julia Clark, Austin 

Jennifer Cunningham, Houston 

Shannon Lawler, Killeen 

Delma Lopez, Skidmore 

Ann Minter, Baytown 

Cynthia Buchanan, Georgetown 

i BASS CLARINET 
Leigh McRae, Houston 



Symphonic Band 

ALTO SAXOPHONE 

Brian Kinkade, Pearland 
Michelle Vanecek, Temple 

TENOR SAXOPHONE 

John Janssen, Portland 

BARITONE SAXOPHONE 

Paul Wardashki, San Antonio 

TRUMPET 

Rock Brown, Georgetown 
Kathryn Callaway, McAllen 
Tracy Harting, Dallas 
Donna Hastings, Lubbock 
Randy Monk, Gilmer 
Paul Vestal, George West 
John Villafana, San Antonio 
Monroe Walker, Channelview 

FRENCH HORN 

Jennifer Giroux, Huntsville 
Ted Kehoe, Tomball 
Elizabeth Powell, Carrizo Springs 
Kathryn Voigtel, Nacogdoches 



TROMBONE 

Whitney Anderson, San Antonio 
Keith Coe, Tomball 
Richard Light, Alice 
Paul Venable, Georgetown 
Peggy Hailey, Kenedy 

EUPHONIUM 

Rachel Merrill, Austin 
Steven Self, Columbus 

TUBA 

Kevin Lungwitz, Houston 
Piper Purcell, Bivins 

PERCUSSION 

Jana Cook, Vernon 
Stacy Flood, Temple 
Marc Erck, Austin 
Holli Leggett, McAllen 
Valerie Pilcher, Corpus Christi 
Cathy Valdez, Georgetown 



Organizations — 75 



B 




D 



Via delta pi 



Zeta Chapter 



Colors: White and Blue 

National Founding: May 15, 1851 

Wesleyan College 

Local Founding: 1907 








■H 







PI 






76 — Greeks 



m 




Greeks — 77 



B 



Theta Epsilon Chapter 

Colors: Silver, Gold, and Blue 
National Founding: Thanksgiving Eve, 1888 

Boston University 
Local Founding: 1911 



Right: Stephanie Sunseri and Laura Phelps enjoy the Spring Formal. Lower: Tri 

Delts at Derby Day. 





78 — Greeks 



B 





(opposite) Stephanie and Laura make 
that ever-popular delta, (top) Sisters! 
(top right) Sophomores show their 
pledge class unity, (middle) Upperclass 
pledges show their humor, (lower) Katie 
and Stephanie. 



Greeks — 79 



Wrf 





Gamma Zeta Chapter 

Colors: Old Rose and Vieux Green 

National Founding: October 24, 1902 

Miami University 

Local Founding: 1946 




80 — Greeks 



D 




Opposite Page: Martha De Lair and Marilyn Lane show that sisterly spirit. Top Left: Karen, Susan, Amy and Martha 
Sue play around during State DZ meeting. Top Right: Susan Hook smiles for the camera. Bottom: Bid day is a happy 
occasion for these Delta Zetas. 



Greeks — 8 1 




JOEY GiMfNEZ RiCH FR' 






4.W 



I BRADY MICHAEL DEANE TODD ESSE 



JOHN KOSTY MATTHEW MOTES JURR1EN PENTINGA 







I SALXS JERRY YOUNG 8RAD Z1EUNSKI 



82 — Greeks 



m 




(Opposite) Everyone wants to take a picture with Diane, (top) What porches are 
made for! (lower left) Marcus and his "little buddy" pose for the camera, (lower 
right) The Pledge Class of 1986 remember Southern Gray. 



83 — Greeks 



HI 



Iota Chapter 

Colors: Scarlet, Green, and White 

National Founding: December 10, 1869 

Local Founding: 1886 

Right: Sarah Faulkner, Starduster, at Sigma's Bruise and Blues party. Lower: The 

1985-86 Kappa Sigma Chapter. Opposite upper right: The Sigma Fall pledge class. 

Opposite upper left: Sigma at the ADPi fall party. Opposite lower right: Ashley 

Turner and Tish McClellan mix. Opposite lower left: The Sigma Homecoming 

Parade entry. 





84 — Greeks 



m 






^^■^^HHE?^8|H 






^^^ "" ' 









*t«r 





Greeks — 85 



D 



Gamma Chapter 

Colors: Azure and White 

National Founding: December 24, 1848 

Miami University, Ohio 

Local Founding: 1886 

Right: Phi Delts party at Spring Formal. Lower: The 1985-86 Phi Delta Theta 

Chapter. Opposite upper: Partiers at the Phi Mexican Mania Party. Opposite lower 

right: Don't mess with these guys. Opposite lower left: The Phi Delts and Beth 

party at the DDD formal. 





86 — Greeks 



D 




Greeks — 87 



□ 



kappa alpte 



Alpha Omicron Chapter 

Colors: Garnet and Gold 

National Founding: 1868 

University of Virginia 

Local Founding: 1910 












mm 






il*M 



«w I fig 1 nf 



4 lili I 1 









FD0 











pi Kappa Aif 



ina 



19 






lUi 





fhtuthtnfslfm Uttiitfrsiij 





on 

r \ SI Ik 4 & « 

HP! 
y 









Greeks 




(opposite) Neal Burt represented the 
Pikes in London during the fall (top) 
Bid Day excitement (top right) Jim 
Fagan, Boots Elliot & co. walk in 
cognito down the street, (lower) Pikes 
win University Sing . . . again. 



89 — Greeks 



a 



iSs "feu. alpha 



Lambda Chapter 

Colors: Steel Gray and 

Turquoise 

National Founding: October 

15, 1898 

Longwood College 

Local Founding: 1906 








Zrta JHau Alpha 



19 




BB 



5? n \ 1 1 1 1 in r t » t r n i Mitinrrsittt 





90 — Greeks 



30 











Opposite Page: Andrea and Julie 
enjoy the ZTA Spring Formal. Top 
Left: Executive Council. Top right: 
Kathy Dunn and friends. Lower left: 
ZTA Big Brothers cheer for their 
sisters. Lower right: MC, Jennifer 
and Tish pick great places to relax. 




Greeks — 91 






OLD TRADITIONS . . . Southwestern 



i*ii 



92 - Administraiion 



c\d\i\\\\MS>{vstioi/ 






UNIVERSITY 




°Uls s£° 




•I 



Administration 93 





UNIVERSITY 



1 




Quis s£° 




Dr. Roy B. Shilling, Jr. 

President 

Southwestern University 



Administration 






\ 



iff 

:* 3K "» : 

| f> i I 

afe * ar 




WILLIAM B. JONES 

Administrative Vice President 



JOHN LIND 

Vice President for Admissions 



THEODORE D. LUCAS 
Dean of The School of Fine Arts 



96 — Administration 




G. BENJAMIN OLIVER 

Dean of The Brown College of Arts and 

Sciences 



de&ns a[ \4 Vice presidents ^ J 





MARILYN M. PARROTT 

Vice President for University Relations 



WILLIAM D. SWIFT 
Dean of Students 



KIRK TREIBLE 

Vice President for Fiscal Affairs 



Administration — 97 



ANTHONY T. ADESSA, Assistant 

Professor of Music 

MARTHA MITTEN ALLEN, 

Professor of History 

W. RICHARD BASS, JR., 

Instructor of Music \er 





DAVID C. BLUMENFELD, 

Professor of Philosphy 

GEORGE A. BRIGHTWELL, JR., 

Registrar and Instructor of 

Economics and Business 

Administration 

VIRGINIA A. CARWELL, 

Associate Professor of English 



JOHN BARNES CHAPMAN, 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

and Computer Science 

REDA F. CLAY, Assistant Professor 

of Physical Education 

B. JOE COLWELL, Professor of 

Economics and Business 

Administration 



98 — Administration 





WELDON S. CROWLEY, Professor 

of History 

JUDSON AMUEL CUSTER, 

Professor of Education 

WINSTON B. DAVIS, Professor of 

Religion 



-fecul-ty ^^ 




JAN CARLETTA DAWSON, 
Associate Professor of History 
RICHARD T. DENMAN, Assistant 
Professor of Mathematics and 
Computer Science 
VIRGINIA HYDE DUPUY, 
Visiting Artist in Voice 



MICHAEL M. FABRITIUS, 

Instructor of Economics and Business 

Administration 

BILLIE GARRETT FULLINGIM, 

Associate Professor of Education 

DAVID J. GAINES, Assistant 

Professor of English 



Administration — 99 



LEONARD F. GIESBECKE, 

Associate Professor of Economics and 

Business Administration 

EB CARL GIRVIN, Professor of 

Biology 

JACK THOMAS HARRIS, 

Associate Professor of English 





HALFORD W. HASKELL, 

Associate Professor of Classics 

THOMAS WALTER HERBERT, 

JR., Professor of English 

FRED R. HILGEMAN, Associate 

Professor of Chemistry 



DAN CRAIG HILLIARD, 

Associate Professor of Sociology 

WILLIAM DOUGLAS HOOKER, 

Professor of Psychology 

ROBERT A. HORICK, Coordinator 

of Academic Computing 




100 



Administration 




RICHARD J. HOSSALLA, 

Associate Professor of Theatre and 
Speech Communications 
DRUSILLA HUFFMASTER, 
Professor of Piano 
HORACE SAMUEL JACOB, 
Assistant Professor of Biology 



-fi 



8CU 





SHARON KAY JOHNSON, 

Assistant Professor of Education 
EDWIN M. LANSFORD, JR., 
Professor of Biochemistry 
CARLA D'ESTELLE LOWRY, 

Professor of Physical Education 



JAMES L. MALLON, Assistant 
Professor of Physical Education 
ROBERT A. MORGAN, Associate 
Professor of Biology 
THOMAS H. MORGAN, Assistant 
Professor of Physics 



Administration — 101 



BRUCE WAYNE MOSSMAN, 

Associate Professor of Education 

GLADA CAROLE MUNT, 

Assistant Professor of Physical 

Education 

ROBERT C. NEVELN, Assistant 

Professor of Mathematics and 

Computer Science 





GWEN KENNEDY NEVILLE, 

Professor of Sociology 
GEORGE E. NELSON, Professor of 

Music 

FRANCIS W. O'BRIEN, Senior 

Professor of Political Science 



JOHN T. OERTLING, Assistant 

Professor of Theatre and Speech 

\ Communication 

LOIS W. PARKER, Associate 

Professor of English 

PAUL D. PEAK, Assistant Professor 

of Physical Education 




102 



Administration 




FRANCISCO R. PEREZ, Associate 
Professor of Foreign Languages 
F. ELLSWORTH PETERSON, 
Professor of Music 
JESSE EWING PURDY, Associate 
Professor of Psychology 



~fe> 



ecu 





ROBERT C. REINEHR, Assistant 

Professor of Psychology 

REGINE REYNOLDS-CORNELL, 

Associate Professor of French and 

Spanish 

GARY HARDIN RICHTER, 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

and Computer Science 



KENNETH D. ROBERTS, Assistant 

Professor of Economics and Business 

Administration 

ROBERT C. ROEDER, Professor of 

Physics 

GERHILD ROGERS, Instructor of 

German 



Administration — 103 



JOHN NELSON RUSSELL 

SCORE, II, Professor of Religion 

and Philosophy 

RAYMOND LEE SCHROEDER, 

Assistant Professor of Music 

KENNY M. SHEPPARD, Assistant 

Professor of Music Education and 

Choral Music 





WILLIAM NICK SIKES, Associate 

Professor of Education 

ROBERT L. SOULEN, Professor of 

Chemistry 
NORMAN WOODS SPELLMAN, 
Professor of Religion and Philosophy 



SUKSOON-SUH, Professor of 

Political Science 

RUTH A. TAYLOR, Assistant 

Professor of Economics and Business 

Administration 

PATRICK B. VEERKAMP, 

Associate Professor of Art 



104 — Administration 





VICENTE D. VILLA, Professor of 
Biology 



Wfy *h staff m 







MARY ANN VISSER, Instructor of 

Art 

RALPH MARTIN WHITMORE, 

Professor of Mathematics and 

Computer Science 

RICHARD ANDERSON, 

Comptroller 



JANE MORGAN BOST, Counselor 
DENISE CONNERS CORBETT, 
Admissions Counselor 
MONTY CURTIS, Admissions 
Director 



Administration — 105 




JOANNA FOUNTAIN, Director of 

Technical and Audiovisual Services 

DONALD D. HEINS, Assistant 

Dean for Residence Administration 

JANICE FORD HESTER, Recorder 



ANNE MATTHEWS, Director of 

Career Development 

TRUDY PEWE MOHRE, Associate 

Director of Admissions 

JAN PICKETT, Director of Health 

Services 



HAROLD DAMON EIDSON, JR., 

Director of Computer Services 





106 — Administration 




ROBERT C. RADFORD, 

Programmer for the Data Processing 

Dept. 

JANNA SCHULTZ, Womens' Head 

Resident 






JON DAVID SWARTZ, Associate 

Dean for Libraries and Learning 

Resources 

BENJAMIN SHERMAN, Assistant 

Dean for Student Activities 

STEVE SMITH, Mens' Head 

Resident 



CHARLOTTE TAYLOR, Registrar's 

Office 

PAUL UPTHEGROVE, Chief of 

Police 

HENRY W. WOLGEMUTH, 

Reference Librarian 



Administration 



107 






OLD TRADITIONS . 



new directions 



Does 











UNIVERSITY 





ABBOTT, SALLY A., Fr. 

ABEL, JAMS MARIE, Fr. 

ABELANET, MARIE CLAIRE, Fr. 

ADAM, LAURA, Sr. 

ADAMS, BUTCH, So. 



ADAMS, MIKE C, Jr. 

ADATIA, SHAY. So. 

AKIN, MARY, Sr. 

ALLEN, JEFFREY LYNN, Jr. 

ALMOND, MARK RICHARD, Jr. 





ALVAREZ, ABRAHAM, Sr. 

ANDERSON, ANTHONY, Jr. 

ANDERSON, CONDE, Fr. 

ANDERSON, COREY, So. 

ANDERSON, JERRY M., Sr. 



ANDERSON, WHITNEY, So. 

ANDREWS, JULIE. Fr. 

ARNOLD, ANNE, Fr. 

ARIZA, CYNTHIA, Fr. 

ARY, GENE, Fr. 



BABCOK, GLENN ALAN, So. 

BAILEY, SCOTT ALAN, So. 

BAIN, BARRY C, Fr. 

BAKER, BRAD, So. 

BAKER, MINDY, So. 




110 — Students 




BAKER, STEPHANIE, Fr., 
BANKS, BRENT, So. 
BASS, JAMES, ALAN, Sr. 
BATEMAN, JOHN ROBERT, So. 
BATOT, CINDY, So. 



BERLANGA, CLAUDIA, Fr. 
BARDEN, LEE BARNES. Fr. 
BARENDREGT, EWOUT, Fr. 
BARKMAN, JENNIFER LEIGH, Fr. 
BARRERA, MARTHA, Fr. 



S"tud ei/its 





BAVONE, STEPHEN, Fr. 
BEAVERS, STEPHANIE, Fr. 
BEDNAR, BOB, Fr. 
BENNETT, JEFF, Fr. 
BERRY, PATRICK DAMON, Fr. 



BERTRAM, SUSANNE, Fr. 
BILY, ROBIN, Jr. 
BISHOP, DONNA, Jr. 
BLACKWOOD, GLENN, Fr. 
BLAIR, PAUL, Sr. 



BLAUDAU, GERRI M., Fr. 
BOGER, BOB, Sr. 
BOREN, LORI, Fr. 
BOSWELL, ANGIE, So. 
BOWER, JANET, Jr. 



Students — 1 



BRADLEY, LISA, Sr. 

BRADY, CATHY, Jr. 

BRANNIES, GINA RAE, Fr. 

BRANNON, ARVELLA, So. 

BRASHAR, BETTY, Jr. 



BRECHIN, MARK, Fr. 

BRECHT, STACEY, Jr. 

BREVARD, ALAN, Fr. 

BRETHOWER, LISA, Fr. 

BREWER, LISA, Sr. 





BRINKMAN, TIM, Fr. 

BROWN, BERNARD, So. 

BROWN, KARIN, Fr. 

BROWN, MONIQUE, Fr. 

BROWN, ROCK, Fr. 



BUCHANAN, JANIE, Fr. 

BUCHANAN, SHELLEY, Fr. 

BUFKIN, JAMES, Fr. 

BURRIS, BROOKE, Jr. 

BURT, MONIQUE, Fr. 



BURT, NEAL, Sr. 

BURTON, CYNTHIA. So. 

BUTLER, KATE, So. 

CALHOUN, JULIE, Fr. 

CAMPBELL, DON, Fr. 



112 — Students 





CAMPBELL, LATISA, Fr. 
CAMPBELL, PAMELA, Sr. 
CANDISH, JENNIFER, Sr. 
CANTOR, GERALD, Jr. 
CARLSON, CHRISTOPHER, Sr. 



CARMACK, DEBRA, Sr. 
CARRELL, SCOTT, Jr. 
CARON, CHRISTOPHER, Jr. 
CASSELS, JULIO, Fr. 
CAUDELL, GREG, Sr. 



Students 





CAVANAUGH, PAIGH, Sr. 
CAWTHON, MORGAN, Jr. 
CERUTI, FIORELLA, So. 
CHANG, PETER, So. 
CHEYNEY, JOHN JAY, Fr. 



CHILDRESS, ROBERT, So. 
CHRISTIAN, PHILLIP, Fr. 
CLAPP, JUDITH, Jr. 
CLARK, JULIA ANN, Sr. 
CLARK, KIMBERLY, Jr. 



CLEMONS, LEIGH ANN, Fr. 
COATS, LAURA, ANN, Fr. 
COE, KEVIN M., Sr. 
COLE, KEVIN, Fr. 
COLLINS, MARJI ANN, Sr. 



Students — 113 



COMSTOCK, NORMAN, Fr. 

COOK, ANGELE ELIZABETH, Fr. 

COOK, JANA LYNN, Fr. 

COONEY, PAMELA ANN, Fr. 

COOPER, ANNA, So. 



CORBETT, THOMAS, So. 

CORMIE, DUNCAN, So. 

CORN, ROBERT, Sr. 

COUZENS, BEVERLY 

LORRAINE, Jr. 

CRESSMAN, BRIAN EARL, Jr. 





CROUCH, CHRISTINA, Fr. 

CROWE, CARLA JANINE, Fr. 

CROWLEY, LISA DIANNE, Fr. 

CUNNINGHAM, CAMI, Fr. 

CUNNINGHAM, JENNIFER 

DENISE, Fr. 



CURRY, BROCK, Sr. 

DALE, CATHERINE, Jr. 

DARBY, TODD ALAN, Fr. 

DAVENPORT, ROBYN L., So. 

DAVIES, JOHN TERRY, So. 



DAVIS, RUTH ANNE, Jr. 

DEAL, THERESA, So. 

DEAN, MATTHEW, Fr. 

DEANE, MICHAEL DANIEL, Fr. 

DEATON, ROBERT MICHAEL, Fr. 



114 — Students 





DEGENHART, LARA ANN, Fr. 
DELAIR, MARTHA NELL, Jr. 
DELANY, SHANNA GAYLE, Fr. 
DENNY, ANGELA KAY, So. 
DERAKSHARI, KAMI, Jr. 



DE YOUNG, JAMES PATRICK, So. 
DIAZ, DEBORA, Jr. 
DILLINGHAM, MELISSA, So. 
DODGE, ALLYSON, Fr. 
DUCE, SARA, So. 



Students 





DUNAVENT, STACY LYNN, Fr. 
DUNCAN, BENJAMIN, Fr. 
DUNN, KATHERINE, Jr. 
DURRENBURGER, SANDRA 
KAY, Fr. 
EDMONDS, DIANA M., Fr. 



EHRHART, WILLIAM, So. 
EKHOLM, KAREN, Sr. 
ELLIOTT, BOOTS, Fr. 
ELLIOTT, FRANK, So. 
ELLIS, CHRIS, Fr. 



ELWOOD, LEE ANN, Fr. 
ENG, LAI JEAN, Fr. 
ERCK, JEFFERSON, Sr. 
ERCK, MARC, So. 
ERHARDT, HARDY, So. 



Students — 115 



ESPINOSA, TERESA ANN, So. 

ESSE, TODD WARREN, Fr. 

ESTER, DORIS, Jr. 

ETIENNE, TRACE, Sr. 

EVANS, ELISABETH, So. 



FAGAN, JAMES, Fr. 

FARRIN, SCOTT, Fr. 

FAULKNER, SARAH, So. 

FEDOR, ROSALIE, Sr. 

FERGUSON, ANNE BURKETT, Fr. 





FIELD, MEG L., Fr. 

FILLER, JOHN J., Fr. 

FINCHER, ANN MICHELLE, Jr. 

FLANDERS, STACY, Fr. 

FLANIKEN, MIKE, Jr. 



FLEMING, MARCUS JUSTIN, Sr. 

FLINT, KEN, Fr. 

FLOOD, STACY, Fr. 

FLOWERS, ANTHONY, Fr. 

FLOYD, DAVIDELLA, So. 



FLUMMER, DEBRA, Sr. 

FOLETTE, LISA YVONNE, So. 

FORTNUM, REBECCA, Sr. 

FOWLER, MARININA, Sr. 

FOSTER, CLAIRE, So. 



116 — Students 





FOX, ERIC, So. 
FRANTA, KAREN, Sr. 
FRANZ, PAUL, So. 
FRATZEN, LISA, So. 
FRAUSTO, BERTA ROSA, Fr. 



FRIESENHAHN, KRIS, Fr. 
FRIHART, TAMMY, Jr. 
FRYMIRE, RICH, So. 
FULBRIGHT, LESLIE, Fr. 
GAETA, JAMES PHILLIP, Jr. 



Siud ei/rfs 





GAISER, GEORGE, Jr. 
GALLOWAY, EDWARD, Fr. 
GARRISON, CARRIE, Fr. 
GARTNER, STEPHANIE, Jr. 
GELABERT, MARIA, Fr. 



GEORGE, JILL ELIZABETH, Fr. 
GILL, MELINDA FAY, Jr. 
GIMENEZ, JOSEPH JOHN, So. 
GIMENEZ, STEPHANIE, Fr. 
GIPSON, SHERI, So. 



GIROUX, JENNIFER, Fr. 
GLASPY, WILL, Sr. 
GLICK, MICHELLE, Fr. 
GOBER, FRONYE, So. 
GONZALES, STEPHEN, So. 



Students — 117 



GOTT, DIANNE, Fr. 

GRAHAM, HOLLY JEAN, Fr. 

GRAHAM, TAMMY, Sr. 

GRANT, JIM, Fr. 

GRANT, KATIE, Jr. 



GRANT, TINA, So. 

GRAPSKI, LINDA, Sr. 

GRAVES, MARK ANDREW, Sr. 

GREB, ROBYN LYNNE, Fr. 

GREEN, HOLLY K., So. 





GREEN, ROBERT W., So. 

GREEN, WILLIAM A., So. 

GREENLEES, GARY, So. 

GRILLO, MARISA, Fr. 

GUADAGNOLI, MADELINE, Fr. 



HAEM1SEGGER, EMILY 

WYNNE, Fr. 

HAILEY, PEGGY JANE, So. 

HALDEN, MICHAEL SEAN, Fr. 

HALES, STEVEN DOUGLAS, Jr. 

HALL, SUSAN, Jr. 



HAMILTON, BYRON FORD, Fr. 

HAMM, TRACY JANE, Fr. 

HAMILTON, DAVID, Fr. 

HAMPTON, APRIL, Fr. 

HAMRICK, SUSAN, Fr. 




118 — Students 




HANNA, KAREN, Jr. 
HARDAWAY, KATIE, Fr. 
HARMON, BILL, So. 
HARRELL, KRISTY, Sr. 
HARRIS, AMY, So. 



HARRISON, CLAIRE, So. 
HART, CHARLES, Sr. 
HARTING, TRACY LYNN, So. 
HARVEY, JAMES, Sr. 
HASTINGS, DONNA GAYLE, So. 



stud mis 




?^^^9 




HATCHETT, DORITA, So. 
HEAD, LISA, Jr. 
HENDERSON, KELLY, Sr. 
HERRIN, LAURA, Sr. 
HELBING, RUTGER, Fr. 



HENNINGER, STEPHEN 
DOUGLAS, Fr. 

HENRY, PHILIP EDWARD, Fr. 
HERBERT, KIMBERLY ANNE, Fr. 
HERMANN, CATHY, Fr. 
HIEBELER. GLORIA, So. 



HILL, JOHN, Jr. 
HIRSCH, PETE, Jr. 
HOBRATSCHK, DIANNE, Fr. 
HOEFKE, WENDY, Fr. 
HOEGEFELDT, LENA, Fr. 



Students — 119 



HOKE, MARY ELIZABETH, Sr. 

HOLADAY, JOY MARIE, Jr. 

HONTS, ELYN, So. 

HOOKS, SUSAN, Sr. 

HOPKINS, CHRISTOPHER, Fr. 



HOTTENDORF, NICOLE, Sr. 

HOUGHTON, DEENA MARIE, Sr. 

HOUSE, JERRY, Fr. 

HSAIO, MARK, Sr. 

HAUNG, LOURDES, Jr. 





HUANG, MICHELLE, Jr. 

HUDDLESTON, JAY, Jr. 

HUDSON, MICHELLE, Fr. 

HUGHES, AMY, Fr. 

IRIZARRY, JOSEPH, Sr. 



JACOB, SHONALI, Sr. 

JACOBSON, BRAD, Sr. 

JAMES, ANDREW, Jr. 

JANAK, KEVIN, Jr. 

JARAMILLO, PATRICIA ANNA, Fr. 



JEFFERSON, SANDI, Fr. 

JENSEN, ERIC, Fr. 

JENSWOLD, JONATHON. Jr. 

JOHNSON, ANNA, So. 

JOHNSON, DAN, Jr. 



120 — Students 





JOLIFF, DAVID, So. 
JONES, ADRIANNE, Sr. 
JONES, ANDREW, Jr. 
JONES, CAROLINE, Sr. 
JONES, JENNIE, Jr. 



JORDAN, JANA, Fr. 
JUAREZ, NORMA, Sr. 
JUNKER, JULIA, So. 
KARAS, SUSAN, Fr. 
KEAHEY, MIKE, Jr. 




KINKADE, BRIAN, Sr. 
KIPPLE, CHRISTINA, So. 
KLEIHEGE, LINDA, Sr. 
KOCH, KARLA, Sr. 
KRIENKE, CHERRY ANN, Fr. 



KRUSEKOPF, HENRY, Sr. 
KWON. LISA, So. 
KUBALA, SHEILA DAWN, Sr. 
LA PIERRE, JEAN PAUL, Fr. 
LADE, MICHAEL, So. 



Students — 121 



LARRIEVIERE, DANIEL, So. 

LARITZ, ALICIA, So. 

LASHBROOK, ERIC, Jr. 

LATHAM, SUSANNE, Fr. 

LAURIN, JOEL, Jr. 



LAWLER, SHANNON, Sr. 

LAWLOR, RICHARD, Sr. 

LAWRENCE, LORNA, Sr. 

LAZENBY, JESSE, So. 

LEGGETT, HOLLI, Jr. 





LEE, MICHAEL, Fr. 

LERMA, SNADRA, So. 

LEWIS, HEIDI, So. 

LIGHT, RICHARD, Fr. 

LIGHTFOOT, ANITA, Sr. 



LI-PELAREZ, CLAIRE, Fr. 

LITTLE, JACK WAYNE, Fr. 

LOPEZ, DELMA, Sr. 

LOPEZ, JOHN, Fr. 

LOVELL, VALERIE ANNE, Fr. 



LUCAS, MICHAEL STEPHEN, Fr. 

LUKERT, JUDY, Fr. 

LUNDGREN, SHARON, Fr. 

LYSINGER, MICHAEL JAMES, Fr. 

MABERRY, JOHNNY ROY, So. 




122 — Students 




MACHACEK, PATRICIA, Jr. 
MALSON, PAUL, Sr. 
MANN, MARK, Jr. 
MANNING, KENNETH, So. 
MARSHALL, RICHARD, Fr. 



MARTIN, JOHN, Jr. 
MARTINEZ, DAMIAN, Fr. 
MATHIS, TRAVIS, Jr. 
MAYER, TRACY, Jr. 
MC DANIEL, LYSSA, So. 



Students 





MC DOWELL, ALAN, Sr. 

MC GARRITY, TIMOTHY, Jr. 

MC GOWEN, KRIS, Fr. 

MC LELLAND, LETITIA ANNE, Jr. 

MC GUIRE, SHANNON M., Fr. 



MC KEE, HELEN LOUISE, Fr. 
MC KNIGHT, AMY, Sr. 
MC LEMORE, GERALD 
WAYNE, Fr. 

MC MANUS, CONNIE, So. 
MC NEILL, ANNA 
KATHERINE, Fr. 



MERRILL, CYNDI ESTHER, So. 
MIDDLETON. DANIEL, Fr. 
MIGNOSA, AURORA MARY, Fr. 
MILLER, AMY E., Sr. 
MILLER, LORI, Sr. 



Students — 123 



MILLER, MICHELLE, So. 

MINTER, ANN M., Jr. 

MITTAL, ASHOR, So. 

MITTANCK, DEBBIE, So. 

MOAK, SUSAN LOUISE, So. 



MONK, ELLEN MARIAN, Sr. 

MONK, KAREN, Sr. 

MOON, GINGER, Sr. 

MOORE, PATRICK MICHAEL, Sr. 

MOORE, TERRI, Jr. 





MORRIS, GAY LON, So. 

MORRIS, JON, So. 

MORRIS, MARTIN LYNN, Jr. 

MORRIS, TRES, Sr. 

MORRISON, JAMES, Jr. 



MORSMAN, MIKE, Fr. 

MOSS, SCARLETT, Sr. 

MOTES, MATTHEW LANDON, Fr. 

MOULDS, CHRISTINE, So. 

MOUROUX, FRANCOISE, Sr. 



MUCHA, MICHELLE, So. 

MURPHY, MELINDA, Jr. 

NEAVILLE, SAMUEL, Fr. 

NICHOL, MARTHA JO, Sr. 

NICHOLS, JAMES, So. 




124 — Students 




NICOLETTE, GUY, So. 

OBAR, JOYCE, Jr. 

ODIORNE, DEBORAH ANNE, Jr. 

O'HARA, KATEY, Jr. 

OLIVER, SHELLEY, Fr. 



OLIVER, THOMAS, Fr. 
OLSON, CINDY, Fr. 
ORR, CHRISTOPHER, Fr. 
OMALLEY, AIMEE, So. 
PALAGANAS, RAFAEL, So. 



Siudwts jj| 




PAREDES, KATIA, So. 
PARKER, MARGARET, So. 
PARKER, SUSAN, Fr. 
PARSON, REBECCA SUE, Fr. 
PARVIN, KATIE, Jr. 



PARVIN, TERI, Sr. 
PATRICK, KATHLEEN, Jr. 
PATRONELLA, MICHAEL, Jr. 
PATTERSON, LAURA IRENE, So. 
PENDLETON, KIM, So. 



PENNEY, LESLIE, Fr. 
PENNIMAN, LIN, Sr. 
PENNONI, JAMES, So. 
PENTINGA, JURRIEN, Fr. 
PERCHES, ALEJANDRO, So. 



Students — 125 



PERKINS, JAN, Jr. 

PETERS, PAIGE, Fr. 

PETERSON, KIRSTEN, So. 

PHARR, CAROLYN, Jr. 

PHILMON, JENNIFER, Sr. 



PHILLIPS, JENNIFER SUE, Fr. 

PHILLIPS, TRACY, So. 

PILCHER, VALERIE, Fr. 

PORTER, MARGO, Jr. 

POUND, LORI, Fr. 





POWELL, BRANDI, Fr. 

POWELL, ELIZABETH, So. 

POWELL, MICHAEL, Fr. 

PRESSLEY, SARAH, Fr. 

PRINSTER, VICTORIA, Fr. 



PROCTOR, GREGG, So. 

PULCHER, DEE ANN, So. 

PURCELL, PIPER, Fr. 

PUSKARICH, MAGGIE, Sr. 

RAMIREZ, DANIEL, Fr. 



RAMIREZ, REBECCA, Sr. 

RANCE, ROBERT, So. 

RAVERT, LISA, Jr. 

RAWLINS, MARK, Sr. 

RAY, ROBIN, Jr. 




126 — Students 




REAM, LEA, Jr. 
REESE, TRACY, Fr. 
REEVES, JULIE, So. 
REGAN, JUSTIN, Fr. 
RICHARDS, JAY, Fr. 



RICHARDS, LEE ANN, Fr. 
RICKEY, TRISHA. Jr. 
RIGATOS, JERRY, So. 
RIGGS, LAURA, Sr. 
RIGSBY, GAYLE, Sr. 



Stude^fe F^ 




ROBERTS, SHERI, Fr. 
RODGERS, WILLARD, Fr. 
ROEST, TAMMY, Sr. 
ROOSTH, DAVID, So. 
ROPER, KAREN, Fr. 



ROSS, AMY, Jr. 
ROSS, CHARLES, Jr. 
ROSS, SALLY, So. 
ROTHHAMMER, LAURIE, Sr. 
ROWE, DAVID, Jr. 



ROWE, JANA, Fr. 
ROWELL, STEVE, Fr. 
ROUSH, KAREN, Fr. 
ROYCE, JAMES M.. So. 
RUCINISKI, STEPHEN, So. 



Students — 127 



RUSHING, SARAH, Sr. 

RUST, PHYLISS, So. 

RYBA, AMANDA, Fr. 

SAHL, SILKE ANNE, Fr. 

SALAS, NORMA, Sr. 



SALERNO, ELIZABETH, Jr. 

SALLS, ELWOOD KIMBALL, Fr. 

SALSTROM, JULIE, So. 

SANDERS, GEOFFREY, Fr. 

SANTRY, CAMILLE, Fr. 





SCHLATTER, ELIZABETH, Fr. 

SCHLECHTE, SHERI, So. 

SCHROEDER, KAREN, Jr. 

SCHULTZ, JANINE, So. 

SCHWARZENBACH, NICOLAS, Jr. 



SCHWEERS, LISL, Fr. 

SCHWINGER, SHERI, Fr. 

SCOTT, LAURA, Jr. 

SELF, STEVEN, So. 

SELLERS, JOANNA, Sr. 



SERGIOVANNI, STEVEN, Jr. 
SENDOLO, AMOS, Sr. 

SEYMOUR, GOWAIN, Fr. 
SHACKELFORD, STACEY, Jr. 

SHAMP, LEIGH ANN, Fr. 




128 — Students 




SHEARER, SCOTT, Fr. 
SHEFFIELD, KIMBERLY, So. 
SHENK, LISA, So. 
SHEPHERD, SCOTT, So. 
SHEPPARD, ANDY, So. 




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SHUFORD, SALLY, Jr. 
SHUMWAY, SHARON, Jr. 
SILVA, CYNTHIA, Fr. 
SIMMONS, DAWN, Jr. 
SIMON, KENNETH, So. 



Studewfe 





SIMPKIN, LISA, Fr. 
SIMPSON, DENA, Fr. 
SIMS, STACEY, Fr. 
SIPTAK, JO ANN, Jr. 
SIU, MARIA LUISA, Sr. 



SMITH, AMY, Jr. 
SMITH, GRANT. Fr. 
SMITH, LAURA, So. 
SMITH, MARCELINA, Jr. 
SMITH, ROBERT, So. 



SMITH, SABRINA, Fr. 
SMITH, WENDY, So. 
SMITH, STEPHANIE, Sr. 
SNOW, DEBBIE RICHBURG, Sr. 
SORIA, MICHAEL PETER, So. 



Students — 129 



SUTHERLAND, CANDY, Fr. 

SPIER, CHRISTOPHER, Sr. 

SPENCER, AARON, Fr. 

SPRINKLE, LAURIE, Sr. 

STALLONES, ROBERT, So. 



STANLEY, CINDY, Jr. 

STANLEY, DESIREE, So. 

STANLEY, ELIZABETH, Fr. 

STANLEY, LANA, Fr. 

STANLEY, MARGARET, Jr. 





STEFEK, DEBORAH. Jr. 

STELL, TOM, So. 

STEMPLE, LINDA, So. 

STERLING, LYNETTE, Fr. 

STEVENS, SUSAN, Sr. 



STEWART, ADAM, Fr. 

STEWART, ERIC, So. 

STEWART, LARA, Fr. 

STITH, JAMES, Fr. 

STOCKHAM, BETH, Jr. 



STOKES, JENNIFER, Jr. 

STRICKLAND, SHANE, So. 

STROMBERG, KRISTEN, Fr. 

STUTES, RANDY, Sr. 

SUDERMAN, SHELLY DAWN, Fr. 



130 — Students 





SULKOWSKI, DAVID, So. 
SUNSERI, STEPHANIE, Jr. 
SUTHERLAND, CHERYL, So. 
SWOBODA, STACY, Fr. 
SWORDS, ERICA, Sr. 



SYDOW, SYLVIA, Jr. 
SYLVESTER, HOLLY, Jr. 
TAGGART, FREDERIC 
KRAMER, Sr. 

TAYLOR, ROSS EDMOND, Sr. 
TAYLOR, TREG, So. 



S4ld 



tv\ 





TESTA, PALMIRA ROSA, Fr. 
TIEMAN, BETSY, Sr. 
TOEWE, MELISSA, Fr. 
TOMPKINS, DARIN JAY, Fr. 
TOUNGATE, BILLIE JEAN, Sr. 



TOWNSEND, JENNIFER 

ELIZABETH, Fr. 

TRACHTA, KENDRA LEA, Fr. 

TRIETSCH, PAULA, Sr. 

TUNNELL, JULIE, Sr. 

TURNER, ASHLEY STOCKTON, So. 



TURNER, KAREN LEE, Fr. 
TURNER, TEDDY JAMES, Fr. 
TYLER, LAURA K., So. 
TYLER, MARGARET, 
JOHNSTON, So. 
UPHAUS, JEFF, Fr. 



Students — 131 



VAN, THANH THI, Fr. 

VAN ARSDEL, WILLIAM, So. 

VANDER STRATEN, DAVID, Fr. 

VANDRUFF, LEE, Sr. 

VANECK, MICHELLE DENISE, Sr. 



VAN WYNGARDEN, 

AMY LYNN, Fr. 

VESTAL, PAUL, Jr. 

VICKERS, JAN, Fr. 

VIELAFANA, JOHN, So. 

VOIGTEL, KATHRYN RENEE, Fr. 





WALKER, DARLA KAY, Fr. 

WALKER, JOHN, Fr. 

WALKER, LAURA ANN, Fr. 

WALKER, LEIGH ANN,Jr. 

WALKER, MONROE, Jr. 



WALSH, MARCE LYNN, Jr. 

WALTER, DAVID G., So. 

WALTHER, DEBORAH, Sr. 

WANG, JEFFREY S., Sr. 

WARBURTON, MICHAEL 

SHAWN, Fr. 



WARD, LEIGH ANNE, Jr. 

WARDASKI, PAUL, Fr. 

WATSON, SUSAN MARIE, Fr. 

WEBB, ELISE, Jr. 

WEBB, JEFFERSON, Jr. 




132 — Students 




WEBER, KATHY, Sr. 
WEEKS, ELBERT MATTHEW, Fr. 
WEGER, JOHN FREDRICK, Fr. 
WEIR, MICHAEL ROSS, Jr. 
WEIR, TRACEY ELIZABETH, Jr. 



WEISINGER, TOM MARVIN, Fr. 
WELLS, MICHELLE, So. 
WELLS, DOUGLAS BRETT, So. 
WELLS, LURLEEN INEZ, Fr. 
WELMAKER, MARY 
ELIZABETH, So. 




WHEELER, ELIZABETH ANN, So. 
WHITE, KEVIN, Sr. 
WHITT, KEVIN, So. 
WIGGINS, GERRY, Sr. 
WILCOX, MELISSA, Fr. 



WILLIAMS, SEAN, Fr. 
WILLIAMS, MARCIA, Jr. 
WILLIAMSON, DEBBIE, Sr. 
WILLIAMSON, LESLIE, So. 
WILLIS, KAREN, So. 



WILSON, LESLIE, Fr. 
WILSON, NATALI, So. 
WILSON, ROBERT, Sr. 
WILSON, STEPHEN, Fr. 
WILT, HEATHER, So. 



Students — 133 



WINDELER, KIMBERLY, Fr. 

WITTER, SHELLY, Fr. 

WINN, KAREN, So. 

WOFFORD, NANCY, So. 

WOLK, NICK, So. 



WOLTZ, JEFFEREY, So. 

WONG, ESTHER, Fr. 

WRIGHT, CHARLES, Jr. 

WRIGHT, KRISTI, Jr. 

WUEST, MICHELLE, Fr. 





YAMKA, KELLY, Sr. 

YAPLE, LAURA, Sr. 

YATES, DAVID, Fr. 

YERKES, NANCY, Sr. 

YOUNG, JERRY MC FADDIN, FR. 



ZGOURIDES, KIMBERLY, Jr. 

ZIKA, SAMANTHA, Jr. 

ZORN, DANIEL, So. 




134 — Students 





Troy John "Kip" Cascio 

1964 - Mar 18, 1986 



135 





OLD TRADITIONS . .new dWedms 



136 — Sports 





UNIVERSITY 






Sports — 137 



m 



Under the coaching of Paul Peak and the 
court leadership of Ail-American Bobby 
Deaton, this year's Pirates were the talk of 
the town. Deaton played superbly the entire 
season, and his and his teammates efforts 



payed off with another trip to the NAIA 
Basketball Championships in Kansas City. 
Bruce Lewis, Wally Meyer, Jim Rathburn, 
and others made this team a viable 
contender for the national crown. 




Men's Basketball 



(top) Holly Sylvester, trainer, Tom Sweeney, Asst. Coach, 
Bruce Lewis, Bobby Deaton, Troy Bijou, Jim Rathburn, Steve 
Henderson, Coach Paul Peak, (second) David Peak, Pete 



Fink, Wayne Little, Jeff Knebel, Paul Williams, Jeff Kaman 
(front) Greg Potter, Wally Meyer, Rick Dozier. 



138 — Sports 




139 



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140 — Sports 



Southwestern University's volleyball season 
was definitely an exciting one. It came to an 
end with a heart-breaking loss to archrival, 
St. Edwards in 5 games. Finishing the season 
with a 28-10 was quite respectable for the 



m 



Lady Pirates. They were led by Kathy 
Chapman, Tela Lindsey and seniors Tina 
Bachtold and Carol Fleuriet. Despite trouble 
with injuries, the volleyball squad were able 
to be winners. 




Women's Volleyball 



Top) Kristy Horton, Sheri Roberts, Amy Van Wyngarden, Williamson, Tela Lindsey, Kathy Chapman, Gerri Bludau, 
fina Bachtold, Debbie Bowden. (front) Asst. Coach Debbie Carol Fleuriet, Ann Hargrove, trainer, Coach Glada Munt 



Sports 



141 




142 — Sports 



XI 




143 



a 



Women's basketball has developed into an 
established, respected program both on and 
off campus. Since Coach Reda Clay's 
arrival in 1981, the team has excelled. Led 
by Lela Robertson, Teri Parvin and Mindy 



Lackey, the lady Pirates had yet another 
successful year. Winning a majority of their 
games, they brought honor and respect to 
Georgetown. 




SMITHWFQTCDM IIMIVFPQIT 



Women's Basketball 



(top) Anna Cooper, Mindy Lackey, Lela Robertson, Cheryl 
Sutherland, Wendy Smith, Coach Clay (Middle) Nacy 
Wiegand, Stephanie Baker, Melissa Dillingham, Kathleen 



Patrick, Teri Parvin, Stacy Swoboda (front) Wendy Stinson, 
Angela Tennison, Margaret Butler, Carolyn Guyton and 
Shari Schwinger. 



144 — Sports 



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145 — Sports 



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146 — Sports 



Varsity Baseball 



Back Row (L to R) Wayne Sheffield, Jeff Allen, Mike Timlin, 
Mike Cavers, Mike Anderson, Jim Phillips, Burke O' Malley, 
Mike Stanton, 3rd row - Coack Ellison, Tom Collins, Andy 
Landry, Rich Frymire, Bill Rundzeiher, Justin Reagan, Coach 



Mallon, 2nd row - Ed Bazan, Brad Baker, Derek Kempf, Barry 
Morrell, James Mills, Danny Cohen, A. J. Waznick, Chris Ellis, 
1st row - Donny Shelton, Jeff Guisty, Lornn Hudson, Peter 
Wellman, Mike Patronella, Jay LaGrone, Pat Meyers 




Plagued by injuries and just bad luck, the Bucs fin- 
ished the season with a 46 - 30 record. After having 
played in the NAIA World Series in the last few year, 
being eliminated in the District IV playoffs wasn't 
very satisfying for the SU team. The team was boosted 
by outstanding performances from A.J. Waznik. He 
led the team in runs scored with 74, broke SU's single- 
season home run record with 28, and tied the old 
record for RBIs in a season with 84. He also led the 
team with a .579 slugging percentage. A young pitch- 
ing staff, lead by Mike Anderson, Jeff Allen, Eddie 
Bazan and Mike Cavers gained experience, which will 
make the future optomistic. 



Sports — 147 





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148 — Sports 






149 





Lacrosse 



(front) Jon Rice, Russell Klawunn, Mike Seay, Jerry Young, 
Whitney Anderson, Leslie Penny, Jamie Hein, Michael 
Chaing, Tom Stell, Don Earles, Wynne Haemisegger (second 
row) Monty Curtis, Robert Young, Travis Mathis, Rob 
Ranee, Matt Norris, Ford Hamilton, Michael Deane, Chris 



Carlson, Todd Esse, Kim Sails, Willard Rodgers, Treg Taylor, 
Phil Henry, Dan Boobar, Gerry Monohan, Beverly Couzens, 
(not pictured: Andy Walker, David Mock, Lee Barden, Tony 
Anderson) 



150 — Sports 



fea 




Varsity Tennis 



(front) Mike Flick, Kim Haney, Mindy Baker, Lisa (top) Coach Mike Fabritius, James Pennoni, Paul Malson, 

Brethouer, Guy Nicollette, (second) Jeff Bennett, Steve Mark Rawlins, Wes Willaert. 

Ruczinski, Donna Medley, Cindy Batot, James De Young, 



Sports — 151 




D 



152 — Closing 




ts Worth <"t '. 




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Closing — 153 



154 — Closing 






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156 — Closing 




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Closing — 157 



158 — Closing 




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Closing — 159 



Southwestern . . . 

it's Worth it ! 





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160 — Closing 



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